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Employer Information

 

Benefits to Business

How Employers Can Help

How Jurors Are Summoned

Length of Service

Pay Policy

Proof of Attendance

Employee Protection

Return To the Jury Services Main Page

 

For our jury system to work, it is essential that the courts and employers work in partnership to ensure that all Kings County residents are available to serve jury duty when summoned.  Without cooperation from the local business community, we risk losing a fundamental principle upon which we, private and corporate citizens alike, depend.  Cooperation from employers is essential to maintaining a strong jury system.  The importance of your participation cannot be emphasized enough.

We wish to extend our deepest appreciation to public and private employers in the Kings County community for supporting our jury system! 


  Benefits To Business

Businesses frequently benefit directly from our legal system.  The civil litigation system in particular is filled with a variety of business-related disputes.  These may include actions concerning contracts, product defects, wrongful termination, malpractice, and environmental issues.

How Employers Can Help

Employers and businesses are encouraged to help support the jury system by paying employees while they are serving jury duty.  Many people cannot afford to serve if they will lose their salaries or wages. Far too many potential jurors have asked to be excused because the loss of income would create a financial hardship.  If together, we can decrease the number of people claiming financial hardship, we create a much broader cross section of society available to serve.  This will help create juries that are truly representative and reflective of our community.  By agreeing to compensate employees during jury service, not only will employers continue to enjoy the benefits of the jury system, but they will contribute towards its improvement. 

How Jurors are Summoned

The selection and management of jurors is governed by the California Code of Civil Procedure.  Jurors' names are selected at random from lists of registered voters and persons who have valid California drivers licenses or identification cards issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles.  The two lists are combined to create one Master Jury List.  One-thousand (1,000) prospective jurors each week are randomly selected from the master list to receive a summons.  The summonses are mailed approximately 10 days prior to the service date.  The summons contains information and instructions on how to have jury service postponed; how to request to be excused from jury service; or how to notify the court of disqualification from jury service.         

Length of Service

While employers have valid concerns about how jury service affects their available resources, it is important to know the steps that have been taken to reduce the length of service for jury duty.  

In order to minimize the number of jurors who must appear in person and avoid unnecessary inconvenience to your employee and to you, a 24-Hour Recorded Message  process is used.  This means a juror is instructed to telephone the county number (559)582-1010 and the extension listed on the summons for reporting instructions.  The juror is instructed to listen to the recording in it entirety.  It will inform the juror if the trials have been confirmed and certain sequence numbers are ordered in or if the entire group is ordered to appear.  It will also inform the juror if the trials have been vacated and their service is no longer required.

If a juror is selected to serve on a trial as a sworn juror, their term of service will be the length of that trial.  Trials vary in length, but generally last two to three days

Under the One Trial/One Day system, if a juror is not selected to serve on a trial by the end of their first day at the courthouse, and the judge has not ordered the juror to return for another day of jury selection, the juror has completed jury service.  Approximately 80% of our prospective jurors complete their service in one day.

The implementation of one trial/one day jury service has helped reduce the uncertainty of when employees can return to work.  The majority of employees will return to work within one to two days after reporting for jury service. 

Pay Policy

State Law does not currently require employers to continue paying the salary of employees while they are serving as jurors.  However, many employers including state, federal, and local government agencies, have a policy which compensates employees for at least part, if not all the time spent for jury service.

If employers do pay, they have the right to require employees to remit to them the fees received for jury service.  Prospective jurors are paid the amount mandated by the State Legislature, $15.00 per day and 34 cents per mile, one way for the second day of service and every day thereafter.  There is no pay for the first day of service.  "Service" is defined as physically reporting to the courthouse.  Days spent on standby service do not count as payment days.

Proof of Attendance 

When you have completed your jury service you may report back to the Jury Commissioner’s Office and request a “Work Confirmation” form to present to your employer.  If you forget to obtain the form before leaving you can call the jury staff at (559)582-1010 extension 5041 or 5042 and they will be happy to fax a copy to you directly or to your employer.  If your employer requests a daily account of your attendance, you can pick up a form each day.

Employee Protection

As the employer, you must allow an employee time off to serve on a jury.  The California Labor Code, section 230 outlaws any employer from firing or harassing an employee who is summoned to court  for jury service.  The California Education Code sections 44037 and 87036  protect teachers and students as well. Employers can also be prosecuted criminally and face a misdemeanor charge if found guilty. If you wish to view the California Labor Code or the Education Codes, they are available through the California Law web site located at www.leginfo.ca.gov/calaw.html. Then, follow the directions for finding the code(s) you are interested in.

 

 

 
Superior Court of California, Kings County
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